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January 23, 2018
English
FREE
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Ninth Grade English

In this course you will learn how to analyze literature in its three primary forms, poetry, prose, and drama. You will also learn to recognize each of the major literary genres, fiction, non-fiction, prose, novel, novella, short story, epic poetry, lyric poetry, and drama. You will also be introduced to the different ways each genre is read, that is we read a poem differently from a play or novel and fiction a bit differently than non-fiction. You will then learn to express your thoughts and opinions on what you have read. Much of your professional lives will be spent responding to written or verbal forms of communication so it follows that the ability to read, understand, and communicate your understanding is a valuable skill to possess and develop, even if, God help you, you never read another line of great literature. It is our aim to teach you to express your thoughts, impressions, and opinions so that they can be understood by the average reader. You will be expected to write cogent essays that are well developed and defended that successfully persuade others of the validity of your thoughts. This does not mean you have to persuade others to think like you. It does mean that others even if they do not come to share your view understand the merits of your view. As you study literature the awareness should strike you that there are many "right" answers to the issues discussed. What is important is not that you reach some sanctioned conclusion, but that your conclusions are defensible. It is a further aim that you learn to understand and write about different points of view. To fully understand your own point of view you must know, and to a certain extent understand, opposing points of view.

This is the first goal of this class, and the second is like unto it: to develop critical thinking skills. The first step in this process is to understand our own thinking. "What do I think about this and why do I think it?" are questions we must constantly ask ourselves. It is a presumption of this class that writers write to, among other things, express ideas and communicate points of view. Hopefully the process of analyzing ideas and different points of view will expand, or even change, your thinking on the issues the various authors raise. To understand the ideas a work of literature expresses it is helpful to understand and appreciate the forms they use. For example, why did the author write a sonnet instead of an ode? It is also important to be able to assess a work's artistic merit. It is important to remember that it is possible to recognize the artistry with which a poem or story is written without personally "liking" it. It is also important to recognize how authors use the various literary devices to tell their stories. As a result of pursuing these two sets of goals you should come to understand literature, its artistry and craft.

Instructor:  John Wilson Jr
already started
English
FREE
Details

A. P. English Language and Composition

"You must read, Alice, before it's too late. You must fill your mind with the converted images of the past: the more the better. . . . These images, apart from anything else, will help you put the two and twos of life together, and the more images your mind retains, the more wonderful will be the star studded canopy of experience beneath which you, poor unfortunate primitive creature that you are, will shelter." Fay Weldon Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen

As often as a study is cultivated by narrow minds, they will draw from it narrow conclusions." John Stuart Mill

"He who knows only his side of the case knows little of that." John Stuart Mill

This class is meant to prepare students for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition test while also covering the eleventh grade American Literature curriculum.

Instructor:  John Wilson Jr
already started
English
FREE
Details

British Literature

 

"To them that demand what fruits the poets of our time bring forth or wherein they are able to prove themselves necessary to the state, thus I answer. First and foremost, they have cleansed our language from barbarism and made the vulgar sort here in London, which is the fountain whose rivers flow round about England, to aspire to richer purity of speech than is communicated with the community of any nation under heaven. The virtuous by their praises they encourage to be more virtuous, to vicious men they are as infernal hags, to haunt their ghosts with eternal infamy after death. The soldiers, in hope to have his high deeds celebrated by their pens, despiseth a whole army of perils, and acteth wonders exceeding all human conjecture. Those that care neither for God nor the devil by quills are kept in awe. Multi famam, saith one, pauci conscientiam verentur . (Many respect what others say, few respect what their conscience tells them.)" Thomas Nashe, Pierce Penniless

 

This class covers the twelfth grade British Literature curriculum.

 

 

 

 

Instructor:  John Wilson Jr
already started
English
FREE
Details

American Literature

"You must read, Alice, before it's too late. You must fill your mind with the converted images of the past: the more the better. . . . These images, apart from anything else, will help you put the two and twos of life together, and the more images your mind retains, the more wonderful will be the star studded canopy of experience beneath which you, poor unfortunate primitive creature that you are, will shelter." Fay Weldon Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen

As often as a study is cultivated by narrow minds, they will draw from it narrow conclusions." John Stuart Mill

"He who knows only his side of the case knows little of that." John Stuart Mill

This class covers the eleventh grade American Literature curriculum.

Instructor:  John Wilson Jr
already started
English
FREE
Details